Alabama

                                                                                                                                                      http://www.hslda.org/hs101/AL.aspx

 

Compulsory School Attendance Age

Children ages 6-17 must attend school. Children may start at age 7 with written notification to local school district. Children attending a church school may withdraw before the age of 17.

1. Homeschooling with a church.

2. Private school

3. Homeschool using a private tutor, must be an Alabama certified teacher. A private tutor’s instruction must be in English and must include the same branches of study that are required to be taught in the public schools. The tutor must teach for at least three hours a day, for 140 days each calendar year, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
The private tutor must submit a statement to the county or city superintendent, listing the tutor’s students, the subjects taught, and the proposed tutoring schedule. The tutor must also keep a register of work, showing daily the hours of instruction, and of attendance (including absences). The tutor must also make such reports as the State Board of Education may require.

In Alabama, there are three options under which you can legally homeschool. Note that church schools and private schools can establish their own policies for teacher qualification, days of instruction, and required school subjects.

Homeschooling with a Church

A home may be the location where a child receives instruction as a student attending a church school. A parent may establish a church school in the home, or the home may be an extension of an existing church school.
When your child is first enrolled in a church school, you must notify the superintendent of your local public school by filing a church school enrollment form. You must use the form provided by the local public school superintendent.

Homeschooling with a Private School

If you, the parent, are establishing a private school in your home, you must register every year by October 10 with the Alabama Department of Education.
Registration includes providing school statistics such as the number of instructors and enrolled students, student attendance, course of study, length of term, cost of tuition, funds, value of property, and the general condition of the private school.
Five days after the start of public school, the private school must report to the county or city superintendent the names and addresses of all school-age children enrolled in the school.
Thereafter, on a weekly basis, the private school must report the names and addresses of all school-age children (1) who enroll in the school, or (2) who are absent without a lawful excuse. Private schools must furnish any other reports required by the state superintendent of education or reports required by the county or city superintendent relating to the school attendance laws. The principal teacher of the private school must keep an attendance register for every school day of the year.
Private schools must require their students to show proof of immunization, or medical or religious exemptions from immunization.

Homeschooling Using a Private Tutor

Private tutors must be Alabama-certified teachers.
A private tutor’s instruction must be in English and must include the same branches of study that are required to be taught in the public schools. The tutor must teach for at least three hours a day, for 140 days each calendar year, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The private tutor must submit a statement to the county or city superintendent, listing the tutor’s students, the subjects taught, and the proposed tutoring schedule.
The tutor must also keep a register of work, showing daily the hours of instruction, and of attendance (including absences). The tutor must also make such reports as the State Board of Education may require.

Withdrawing Your Child from Public School

F0rmally withdraw your child from public or private school. Withdraw your child before the next school year begins if you plan on homeschooling your child the upcoming year. See your local school for specific forms or withdrawal procedures. It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent "Certified Mail-Return Receipt Requested." Keep copies of letters and any other paperwork or correspondence for your records.

Arizona

http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/arizona.pdf

Phone: (540) 338-5600 Fax: (540) 338-2733  Website: www.hslda.org

Compulsory School Age

Every child between the ages of 6 and 16 must attend a school.
A home school parent can exempt their child from school if they do not desire to begin homeschooling until the child has reached eight years of age by September 1 of that school year. The parent must file an affidavit with the county superintendent stating their desire to delay home school instruction.

Required Days of Instruction: 180
Required Subjects...
Reading, grammar, math, social studies, and science.

Home School Statutes

1. The parent or guardian must file a notarized affidavit of intent to operate a homeschool program with the county school superintendent withing 30 days after homeschooling begins.
2. If the home school is terminated and re-opened, the parent or guardian shall notify the county school superintendent within 30 days of termination of homeschooling and another intent to home school must be submitted. The homeschooling that the child is no longer being instructed at home.
3. The notice of intent must include...child’s name; the child’s date of birth; the current address of the school the child is attending; and the names, telephone numbers, and addresses of the persons who currently have custody of the child.

4. The parent or person with custody must also provide the county school superintendent either a “certified copy of the child's birth certificate" or "other reliable proof of the child's identity and age." Also, if there is no birth certificate, provide an affidavit explaining the inability to provide a copy of the birth certificate.
5. A homeschool that operates under the home school statute is not a private school.  A homeschool is defined "nonpublic instruction conducted primarily by the parent, guardian or other person who has custody of the child" or "nonpublic instruction provided in the child's home."

Teacher Qualifications: None
The parent/teacher’s test requirement was repealed in 1991.

Standardized Tests: None Required
The standardized test and optional evaluation requirement was repealed.

Alaska

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/AK.aspx https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Alaska.pdf
http://www.homeschoolfacts.com/state-laws/alaska-homeschool-state-laws.html

Compulsory Attendance Ages

Between 7 and 16.
A child who is six years old and enrolled in the Required Days of Instruction: None.

Required Subjects: None

Home schools have five options, four of which are under alternative statutes:
Home School Statute...
Option 1: If the child “is being educated in the child’s home by a parent or legal guardian, the child is excepted from compulsory attendance. Under this option, there are no requirements to notify, seek approval, test, file forms, or have any teacher qualifications. This burden is on the state to prove that parents are not teaching their children.
Alaska parents are not required to register their home school with state or local school districts.
Alternative Statutes...
Option 2: Tutoring by a certified teacher for the state of Alaska.
Option 3: The child “is equally well-served by an educational experience approved by the school board,” after a written request for excuse from school attendance.

Option 4: A home school may qualify as a “religious or other private school” as long as it meets the following requirements...
a. The child’s parent must file an annual notice of enrollment (Private School Enrollment Reporting Form) with the local superintendent by the first day of public school.
b. Before October 15 each year, file the “Private and Denominational Schools Enrollment Report” and “School Calendar” forms with the Department of Education.
c. The school must maintain monthly attendance records showing 180 days of school attendance each year. The school calendar and the number of students in each grade must be annually reported to the Commissioner of Education.

d. The definition of a private school is a school “that does not receive direct state or federal funding.
e. The definition of a religious school is a “private school operated by a church or other religious organization that does not receive direct state or federal funding.
f. Maintain and certify to the department of education that permanent records on immunization, courses, standardized testing, academic achievement, and physical exams are kept.
g. According to the Alaska Department of Education’s Guide for Establishing a Private or Religious School, home schools are exempt from fire, safety, and asbestos regulations and developing a corporal punishment policy.
h. If a school is not operated in compliance with this section, it is not exempt from other requirements and must make monthly attendance reports and annual reports to the Commissioner of Education.

Teacher Qualifications: None
Certification is required only if parents use a private tutor.

Standardized Tests: None.

However, if operating as a religious or other private school (option 4), testing is only required for fourth, sixth, and eighth grades. Standardized tests results must be made available to the Department of Education upon request. The parent may select any nationally standardized or norm referenced achievement test that measures achievement in English grammar, reading, spelling, and mathematics.
Withdrawing Your Child From Public School

1. Formally withdraw your child from that school. If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant.
2. Check with your local schools. They may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.
3. We generally recommend that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records. Note: If your child has never attended a public or private school, this section does not apply.

Records
If your state has any specific record keeping requirements, they are listed above. Regardless of your state’s record keeping requirements, HSLDA recommends that you keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law.
You should maintain these records for at least two years. You should keep your student’s high school records and proof of compliance with the home education laws during the high school years (including any type of home education notice that you file with state or local officials) on file forever. HSLDA’s high school webpage has additional information about home school record keeping.

Ontario, Canada

http://ontariohomeschool.org/legal/ http://ontariohomeschool.org/legal/#legalmenu
http://ontariohomeschool.org/homeschooling-faq/

Compulsory Attendance

A person is excused from attendance at school if, the person is receiving satisfactory instruction elsewhere.

Procedures for Parents
Parents who decide to provide home schooling for their child(ren) should notify the school board of their intent in writing at any time of the year.
When parents give a board written notification of their intent to provide home schooling for their child, the board should consider the child to be excused from attendance at school, in accordance with subsection 21(2), clause (a), of the Education Act. The board should accept the written notification of the parents each year as evidence that the parents are providing satisfactory instruction at home. Also, provide written notification to the principal of the school the child has been attending.
Copy of Letter of Intent to Homeschool...http://ontariohomeschool.org/letter-of-intent.pdf
Note: In case the school board sets up an "substantial education" inquiry, A school board's "reasonable grounds" do not always seem reasonable at all. And PPM131, while better than the Johnson policy, is still just a policy as well. Parents should be aware of the actual law and their rights as home-based educators in the event that their local school board tries to impose policies and rules which are not required by law. See this link...http://ontariohomeschool.org/inquiry/

Homeschooling Tips
If your province requires you to register with the Ministry of Education or to submit educational plans, do it.
Every day, record a short description of your family’s activities. You can just use a regular wall calendar with squares big enough to write in. Keep your notes short: Baked cookies. Playgroup at Withrow Park. Piano lessons. Went to Science Center. Library. Made paper-mâché jack-o’-lanterns. If you ever have to prove that your children are learning history, science, or social studies you will have a handy reminder of all the different ways that your children learn.
It can be overwhelming to keep every piece of art or writing that your children produce. Instead of keeping everything, consider photographing some very good examples of their work at least once per month. Be sure to date the work or to use the date stamp on your camera. Another thing I do is to give my children spiral-bound art pads to do their drawing and printing in. As each book is completed,
write the date on the front and toss it into a huge plastic bin in the storage room. If I ever needed to show evidence of their work, it would be available.
If an official from the Ministry of Education is in your home to determine if your children are being educated, don’t volunteer information that is not specifically related to their intellectual development. In other words, even though it is perfectly normal for you that your 4-year-old is still breastfeeding or that you share a family bed with your four children, it might not seem so normal for the person doing the investigation. Also, avoid discussions of vaccines, homebirth, natural healthcare, or other topics that are none of the investigator’s business.

Curriculum
There is nothing in the Ontario Education Act that states you must use curriculum. The main subject areas taught are reading, writing, math, and research The decision of whether or not to use curriculum is determined by each homeschooling family.

Teacher Certification

There is no requirement in the Ontario Education Act for a parent to be a certified teacher in order to homeschool their children. Although many teachers have chosen home schooling for their children, parents from a wide variety of professional and educational backgrounds successfully educate their children at home. Research has shown that homeschooling parents who are not professional teachers do just as well, if not better, than homeschooling parents who are certified teachers.

California

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/California.pdf
http://www.hsc.org/california-compulsory-education.html

Compulsory Attendance Ages
Between the ages of 6 by September 1 and 18 years.

Required Days of Instruction: 175
http://www.pheofca.org/legalfactsheet.html

Required Subjects: Specifically, in grades 1-6, the following courses must be taught: English, math, social science, science, visual and performing arts, health, and physical education. Home schools must be taught in English and “offer instruction in the several branches of study required to be taught in the public schools.

Homeschool Statute: None
Homeschooling is neither explicitly forbidden nor permitted in California statutory law.
Exemptions from attending Public School
1. The private tutoring exemption (section 48224) for children who are instructed for at least three hours each day, 175 days a year by a teacher who holds a valid California teaching credential for the grade taught.

Homeschool Options: How Families Comply with the Education Code
1. An individual home school can qualify as a private school. They establish a private school in their own home. They file a Private School Affidavit (section 33190) annually with the California Department of Education and that they keep specified records on file (copy of filed affidavit, attendance records, immunization, courses of study offered, faculty qualification, and criminal records summary).
2. They enroll their children in a private school that offers a satellite program for homeschooling (PSP) 3. They employ a private tutor or hold a California teaching credential themselves.
4. They send their children to a public school that offers independent study.
5. They enroll their children in a public charter school.

An individual home school can qualify as a private school by filing an annual private school affidavit with the Superintendent of Public Instruction between October 1 and October 15 of each school year.

Out of State Programs
Families enrolled in Out-of-State schools/programs are required by state law to be enrolled in a California private school (single home-based or PSP) with a California physical address for its location. It is unnecessary and unwise to voluntarily mention enrollment in out-of-state schools/programs. It is not illegal in California to be enrolled in an out-of-state program, as long as it is represented as a source of curriculum and/or services and not as a means of legal compliance. Public school pupil records (called cum files) should be sent for but not by an out-of-state program.
Private out-of-state PSPs, while useful for curricular support, only satisfy the legal requirements for public school exemption if the school has filed its own affidavit in California. If you enroll in an out-of-state PSP, you should make sure that the school complies with California law. If it has not filed an affidavit in California, then you must establish your own private school and file an affidavit or comply with the law in some other way.

Withdrawing Your Child From Public School
Follow these guidelines before you take your child out of school:
A. Do not talk to public school officials about your plans to teach your children at home.
B. Join the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) and confirm your membership before withdrawing your child. Contact HSLDA at www.hslda.org or 540-338-5600. We cannot recommend joining any other legal defense organization.
C. If you are enrolling your child in a private school, which you have established in your own home (legal alternative #1 above), you must file a Private School Affidavit. However, if you enroll your children in a "Private School Satellite Program” (legal alternative #2 above), you will not file your own Private School Affidavit. To understand how to file an Affidavit, read our article, Filing The Private School Affidavit at www.pheofca.org D. Your child’s current school should be notified within one or two days of keeping your child at home during the current school’s regular days of required attendance. To do this, a brief letter should be written to explain to the public school officials that you have enrolled your child in a private school located in California.
E. Request your child's cumulative records file from the school where your child has been attending during this same first two days of keeping your child at home from their current school.

1. If you enroll your children in a private school, which you have established in your own home (legal alternative #1 above), you will need to request your child's cumulative records file. HSLDA members will also need to contact the HSLDA Legal Department for direction on how to do this.

2. If you enroll your children in a "Private School Satellite Program” (legal alternative #2 above), the administrator or principal of that private school should request your child’s cumulative records file.

Colorado

https://www.cde.state.co.us/choice/homeschool

https://www.cde.state.co.us/choice/homeschool_law

Compulsory Attendance
A child who is participating in a nonpublic home-based educational program shall not be subject to compulsory school attendance as provided in this article; except that any child who is habitually truant.

Home school programs must have no less than 172 days of instruction, averaging 4 contact hours per day.
Pursuant to Colorado law, parents who wish to begin home schooling must provide written notification of the establishment of the home school program 14 days before beginning the home school program to a Colorado school district. The written notification must include the name, age, place of residence, and number of attendance hours for each child that will be participating in the home school program.
Written notification must be re-submitted to a Colorado school district each year.

Colorado law states that home school programs must include, but are not limited to, the subjects of communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking, mathematics, history, civics, literature, science, and regular courses of instruction in the constitution of the United States. The selection of curriculum is at the discretion of the parent who is overseeing the home schooling program.
Each child participating in a nonpublic home-based educational program shall be evaluated when such child reaches grades three, five, seven, nine, and eleven.

Each child shall be given a nationally standardized achievement test to evaluate the child's academic progress, or a qualified person shall evaluate the child's academic progress. The test or evaluation results, whichever is appropriate, shall be submitted to the school district that received the notification.

Florida

http://a2zhomeschooling.com/laws/united_states/florida_home_school_laws/

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Florida.pdf

Compulsory Attendance
Between 6 and 16 years of age by February 1 are required to attend school regularly.
Required number of hours per day per year – None

The parent is not required to hold a valid regular Florida teaching certificate.

Withdrawing Your Child from School
The parent shall notify the district school superintendent of the county in which the parent resides of her or his intent to establish and maintain a home education program.
The notice shall be in writing, signed by the parent, and shall include the names, addresses, and birth dates of all children who shall be enrolled as students in the home education program. The notice shall be filed in the district school superintendent’s office within 30 days of the establishment of the home education program.

A written notice of termination of the home education program shall be filed in the district school superintendent’s office within 30 days after said termination.

The parent shall maintain a portfolio of records and materials. The portfolio shall consist of the following:
1. A log of educational activities that is made contemporaneously with the instruction and that designates by title any reading materials used.
2. Samples of any writings, worksheets, workbooks, or creative materials used or developed by the student.
The portfolio shall be preserved by the parent for 2 years and shall be made available for inspection by the district school superintendent, or the district school superintendent’s agent, upon 15 days’ written notice. Nothing in this section shall require the district school superintendent to inspect the portfolio.

The parent shall provide for an annual educational evaluation, in which is documented the student’s demonstration of educational progress at a level commensurate with her or his ability. The parent shall select the method of evaluation and shall file a copy of the evaluation annually with the district school superintendent’s office in the county in which the student resides. The annual educational evaluation shall consist of one of the following:

1. A teacher selected by the parent shall evaluate the student’s educational progress upon review of the portfolio and discussion with the student. Such teacher shall hold a valid regular Florida certificate to teach academic subjects at the elementary or secondary level.
2. The student shall take any nationally normed student achievement test administered by a certified teacher.
3. The student shall take a state student assessment test used by the school district and administered by a certified teacher, at a location and under testing conditions approved by the school district.
4. The student shall be evaluated by an individual holding a valid, active license.
5. The student shall be evaluated with any other valid measurement tool as mutually agreed upon by the district school superintendent of the district in which the student resides and the student’s parent.

The district school superintendent shall review and accept the results of the annual educational evaluation of the student in a home education program. If the student does not demonstrate educational progress at a level commensurate with her or his ability, the district school superintendent shall notify the parent, in writing, that such progress has not been achieved. The parent shall have 1 year from the date o receipt of the written notification to provide remedial instruction to the student. At the end of the 1-year probationary period, the student shall be reevaluated as specified in paragraph (1 )(c). Continuation in a home education program shall be contingent upon the student demonstrating educational progress commensurate with her or his ability at the end of the probationary period.

Georgia

https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Pages/Home-Schools.aspx

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/GA.aspx

Compulsory School Attendance Age
Georgia law requires children to attend school between their 6th and 16th birthdays. However, if your child is under 7 and has attended a Georgia public school for more than 20 days, then he must continue to attend school thereafter. Early graduation is allowed if your child has successfully completed all requirements for a high school diploma.

Withdrawing Your Child From His/Her Current School
Formally withdraw your child from that school.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant. It is generally recommend that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.

Georgia law refers to home schools as home study programs. To operate a home study program in Georgia, you must follow the listed

steps:

1. Ensure that the person or people homeschooling your child have the required qualifications.
You must be a parent or a legal guardian of a child before you can file a declaration of intent to home school that child. You may hire a tutor to help you home school your child. The teaching parent or guardian or the tutor in a home study program must have a high school diploma or a GED.

2. Submit an annual declaration of intent.
Within 30 days after you begin homeschooling, and every year thereafter by September 1, you must submit a “declaration of intent to utilize a home study program” to the Georgia Department of Education. You can access online and printable versions of the declaration of intent on the department’s website.
Your declaration must include the names and ages of your students, the location of your home study program, the local school system in which your home study program is located, and the 12-month period that you consider to be your home study program’s school year.

3. Provide the required number of days of instruction.
During the school year, your home study program must provide the equivalent of 180 days of education with each school day consisting of at least four and one-half school hours, unless your child is physically unable to comply with this requirement.

4. Teach the required subjects.
Your home study program must provide a basic educational program that includes, but is not limited to, reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science.

5. Write annual progress reports.
At the end of every school year, you must write a report of the progress that your child made in each of the required subjects. You must keep this report in your records for at least three years. It does not have to be submitted to public school officials.

6. Test your child every three years after he or she completes 3rd grade.
Your child must be tested every three years, beginning at the end of the 3rd grade. You may administer the test if you do this “in consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation of norm reference tests.” Test results do not have to be submitted to public school official HSLDA has some information that may help you locate a test provider on our website. We believe you should choose a standardized test that includes testing in reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science.

Website for Online Declaration of Intent
https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Pages/Home-Study-DOI.aspx

Illinois

Compulsory School Attendance Age
When your child has his or her 6th birthday, you must start obeying the compulsory attendance law. You are exempt from the law once your child turns 17, or graduates from his or her high school program.

Withdraw Your Child From Public School
Formally withdraw your child from that school. Local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant.

It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.

In Illinois, your home school will be treated as a private school. You do not have to register your home-based private school with the Illinois State Board of Education, nor are you required to obtain state recognition of your home-based private school. In fact, you cannot get your private school registered or recognized—the law does not allow it.

To home school as a private school, you’ll need to follow these guidelines:

1. Teach the required subjects.
Illinois requires you to provide an “adequate course of instruction” to your child covering the following branches of education:
Language arts, Math, Biological and physical sciences, Social sciences, Fine arts, and Physical development and health.
The State Board of Education treats biological and physical science as one combined branch of instruction, and physical development and health as another combined branch.

2. Instruction must be in English.
When you teach your child in your home school, you must do so in English.

3. Know what to call your home school program.
HSLDA recommends that you call your home school a private school when you deal with government officials.
Important exception: You should identify your program as a home school if you are filling out a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) as part of your child’s college financial aid paperwork.

Records
HSLDA recommends that you keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law.
You should maintain these records for at least two years. You should keep your student’s high school records and proof of compliance with the home education laws during the high school years (including any type of home education notice that you file with state or local officials) on file forever. HSLDA’s high school webpage has additional information about home school record keeping.

Kansas

http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/kansas.pdf

Compulsory Attendance Age
“reached the age of 7 and under the age of 18 years.” However, compulsory attendance age ends at 16 years with parental consent. A child under age 7 is subject to compulsory attendance while enrolled in a public school.

Required Days of Instruction
Must teach for a period of time “substantially equivalent” to that of the local public school.

Required Subjects
None for “non-accredited” private schools and public schools

Home School Statute: None
Officially withdraw your child from school.
Choose a name for the school (Jacob's Hope Academy), then register the name and address with the State Board of Education.Keep a copy of the registration in case the state loses the original.
Always refer to your home school as a “private school” when dealing with officials—not as a “home school. The instructor must be “competent.
Instruction must be provided for a period of time “substantially equivalent” to public school, about 186 days. The instruction must be (a) planned and (b) scheduled, and (c) periodic testing must occur.
State approval is not required. The State Department of Education has no authority to approve or Local approval of a private school is not required
Local approval of private school teachers is not required

Kentucky

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/KY.aspx

Compulsory School Age
Children who will turn 6 by October 1 of the school year and who have not turned 18 or graduated from high school must attend school or be in compliance with Kentucky’s homeschool law.

Withdraw Your Child from School
Formally withdraw your child from that school.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant. Local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.
It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.
Note: If your child has never attended a public or private school, this section does not apply.

Complying with your state’s home school law
In Kentucky, there is no home school statute. Home schools operate under the private school statute by complying with the following step
Homeschooling under the private school statute:
1. Notify the board of education.
You must annually send a private school notice of attendance to your local board of education within the first two weeks of the start of the school year. Traditionally, this has been interpreted to be within two weeks from the first day of school in the local school district. Typically the notice should be submitted no later than the second week of August. The notice should list the students you have in attendance at your school and include their names, ages, and addresses.
2. Keep attendance and scholarship reports.
You must keep attendance reports and scholarship reports (i.e. report cards) in a similar manner as your local public schools do. Generally, this means the reports must be updated every six to nine weeks, depending on the schedule your district has chosen.
3. Teach for the required number of days.
You must operate your school for 185 days each academic year, which should include the minimum of 170 instructional days and 1062 total hours of instruction.
4. Teach the required subjects in English.
You are required to include reading, writing, spelling, grammar, history, mathematics, and civics in your homeschool curriculum, and to teach in the English language.

Keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law. You should maintain these records for at least two years. You should keep your student’s high school records and proof of compliance with the home education laws during the high school years (including any type of home education notice that you file with state or local officials) on file forever.

Louisiana

https://www.louisianabelieves.com/schools/home-study

Compulsory Attendance Ages
From the child’s “seventh birthday until his eighteenth birthday...unless the child graduates from high school prior to his eighteenth birthday.”

Required Days of Instruction
180 days

Required Subjects
A “sustained curriculum of a quality at least equal to that offered by including the Declaration of Independence (in elementary school).

Teacher Qualifications: None

A Child Who Participates in a Home Study
1. Parents must apply to the Board of Education for approval of the home study program “within fifteen days after commencement of the program.
2. “The initial application shall be approved if the parent certifies that the home study program will offer a sustained curriculum of quality at least equal to that offered by public schools.
The initial application must include a certified copy of the child’s birth certificate. This, however, is not required for the renewal.
3. A renewal application must be submitted by Oct. 1 of the school year or within twelve months after initial approval, whichever is later.
4. A renewal application “shall be approved” if the parent submits “satisfactory evidence that the program has in fact offered a sustained curriculum of quality at least equal to that offered by public schools at the same grade level. 5. When a child is 11 years old, the parent shall provide evidence of immunization for meningococcal disease.

A student who is withdrawn from public school during the school year, or who attended public school the year before enrolling in a private school, must provide written notification of enrollment to the public school he attended within 10 days of enrollment. This notification must include the student's: legal name, date of birth, gender, and race. In addition, the notification may include a request for the student's transcript.

Massachusetts

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Massachusetts.pdf

Compulsory Attendance Ages
6 by December 31 of that school year to 16 years of age.

Required Days of Instruction
None required, but school districts will use the utilize the same number as public school's required number of days and hours of instruction time for purposes of comparison...180 days at 900 hours at the elementary level and 990 hours at the secondary level.

Required Subjects
Reading, writing, English language and grammar, geography, arithmetic, drawing, music, history and constitution of the United States, duties of citizenship, health (including CPR), physical education, and good behavior.

Home School Statute: None

It is advised that parents officially withdraw their children from the current school of attendance. See your local school district and board of education.

Alternative Statutes Allowing for Home Schools
A “child who is being otherwise instructed in a manner approved in advance by the superintendent or the school committee.” Homeschool in Massachusettes is considered private education.
“School committees shall approve a private school [homeschool] when satisfied that the instruction in all the studies required by law equals in thoroughness and efficiency, and in the progress made therein, that in the public schools in the same town; but shall not withhold such approval on account of religious teaching. There are 4 areas that must be examined before a homeschool education plan is approved. They are:
1. The proposed curriculum and number of hours of instruction of each of the proposed subjects.
2. The competency of the parents to teach their children (superintendents or school committees may not require certification, advanced degrees, or college degrees).

3. Textbooks, workbooks, and other instructional aids, as well as lesson plans and teaching manuals (so that the superintendent or committee can determine the subjects to be taught and the grade level of instruction for comparison with the public school's curriculum). The superintendent or school committee may not dictate the manner in which the subjects will be taught.

4. Periodic assessments (to ensure educational progress and attainment of minimum standards). The court stated that the superintendent or school committee may properly require standardized testing or may substitute, subject to the approval of the parents, another form of assessment.
Home visits are unconstitutional if imposed against the parent's objections. The Supreme Judicial Court ruled that "the school committee cannot, in the absence of consent, require home visits, as a condition to the approval of home education plans." Brunelle vs. Lynn Public Schools. The court also ruled that "the approval of the home school proposal must not be conditioned on requirement that are not essential to the state interest in assuring that all children be educated. Home visits are not essential for children to be educated. The child does not have to attend a public school while waiting for a home school program to be approved. If a school district wants to insist a child be placed in public school, the school of the district has to first prove children were not receiving thorough instruction.

Home education is a right protected by the Fourth Amendment. If a home school is rejected after seeking approval, the burden of proof shifts to the school authorities to show that the proposed home school instruction fails to equal "in thoroughness and efficiency, and in the progress made therein, that in the public schools in the same town."

There is no teacher qualification for home school in the state of Massachusetts.

Standardized Tests
Parents may have their child take the standardized test or use some other form of assessment. This may consist of progress reports, dated work samples, a portfolio review, an assessment by a certified teacher of the parent's choice, or another method agreed upon between the parents and the superintendent or school committee.

Michigan

http://www.homeschoolfacts.com/state-laws/michigan-homeschool-state-laws.html

Compulsory School Age
The law requires a parent or legal guardian of a child from the age of six to sixteen to send his or her child to school during the entire school year, except under certain limited circumstances.

Michigan parents have the right to home school their children.
Home school education is the responsibility of the parent or legal guardian.The parent assigns homework, gives tests and grades these tests. The issuance of report cards, transcripts, and diplomas are the responsibility of the home school family (based on internal standards). If homeschooling continues through grade 12, the parent issues a high school diploma to the graduate.

Home School Registration
The annual registering of a home school to the Michigan Department is not required and is voluntary.

It is not required unless the student has special needs and is requesting special education services from the local public school or intermediate school district.
It is recommended the parent first submit a completed Nonpublic School Membership Report to MDE if special education services will be requested. This form is available on the Michigan home school website – www.michigan.gov/home school. Before special education services are established, the school will contact MDE for verification that this process is complete.
The home school must register each school year to continue services. A list of registered home schools is provided to intermediate school district superintendents each December and March.
It is not required that a parent inform their local school of the decision to homeschool, however, it is suggested.
Failure to do so may result in the student being marked absent and the involvement of the truancy officer. Notification may be a phone call or a written note to the district. Keep in mind that a written note can be placed in the student's school record indicating when the student has withdrawn from the school district.

Teacher Requirement
A parent or legal guardian that registers with MDE is qualified to teach their child if they have a teaching certificate or a bachelor’s degree. However, if they claim an objection to teacher certification based upon a sincerely held religious belief, the minimum education requirement of a teaching certificate or a bachelor’s degree is waived.

Course of Study
Instruction must include mathematics, reading, English, science, and social studies in all grades; and the Constitution of the United States, the Constitution of Michigan, and the history and present form of civil government of the United States, the State of Michigan, subdivisions and municipalities of the State of Michigan in grades 10, 11, and 12.Home-schooled students may enroll in nonessential elective classes at the resident public school subject to the district’s enrollment policy.

Textbooks
Home school families are responsible for purchasing the textbooks and instructional materials of their choice. School districts are not required to provide curriculum, textbooks, or materials to home school families.

Parents are encouraged to maintain student records of progress. These records will assist school personnel with placement should the student enroll in a public or non public school.
The granting of credits and placement of students is solely determined by the receiving school. If a student attends a home school and returns to a public school, the public school generally reevaluates the students for grade placement and the transfer of credit.

There are no required tests for a home-schooled student.
The parent is responsible for administering tests based upon the curriculum they use.
Although not required, home-schooled students may participate in state testing at their  local public school.
There are no public funds available for home schooling.

Minnesota

http://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/minnesota.pdf

Compulsory Attendance Ages
“between 7 and 17 years of age.”
Parents who begin homeschooling and submit their initial report to the superintendent before a student turns 16 are not required to submit notification or perform assessments after the student turns 16.

Required Days of Instruction
None

Required Subjects
Reading, writing, literature, fine arts, math, science, history, geography, government, health, and physical education.

Home School Statute
“The parent of a child is primarily responsible for assuring that the child acquires knowledge and skills that are essential for effective citizenship.”

Annual Reporting
A person providing instruction to a child must file an “initial report” to the Superintendent by 1) October 1st of the first school year after a child has reached age seven, 2) within 15 days of withdrawing a child from public school, or 3) by October 1st when moving into a new school district.
The report must provide the following information: child’s name, birth-date, address, annual test to be used, and immunization compliance information for a child reaching age seven or who is in the 7th grade.  After the “initial report,” a parent annually file a “letter of intent to continue homeschooling”
These changes would include whether additional children are being taught at home. When moving out of a school district, the parent is responsible for notifying the current school district of the move within 15 days. See HSLDA’s “Minnesota Forms and Other Resources” link on the Minnesota state page for these forms.

Teacher Qualifications:
None if the instructor is a parent.
If an instructor is not a parent, his name and statutory qualification ) should be included in either the initial report or letter of intent to continue homeschooling.
Standardized Tests
Children who are not enrolled in a program accredited by a state recognized accrediting agency or public school “must be assessed using a nationally norm-referenced standardized achievement examination.”
Home schools that are accredited by a state recognized accrediting agency are exempt from annual standardized testing requirements.
Unless a parent has passed a teacher competency exam, holds a teaching license, or is directly supervised by a licensed teacher, the parent must also assess his children in the required subject areas that are not covered by the standardized test.
Children scoring below the thirtieth percentile or one full grade below children of the same age must be evaluated for learning problems. Test results do not have to be submitted to the school district.

Record keeping
Parents must maintain certain documentation that indicates that the required subjects are being taught and proves annual tests have been administered. This documentation includes class schedules, copies of materials used for instruction and description of method used to assess student achievement.

Mississippi

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/MS.aspx

Compulsory School Attendance Age
Your child must start attending school in the year when he or she will be age 6 on or before September 1.
Thereafter, your child must continue attending school at least until the year when he or she will be age 17 on or before September 1.
The compulsory school attendance requirement also applies to children who are 5 years old on or before September 1, if they are enrolled in a full-day public school kindergarten program.

Withdrawing Your Child From School
Formally withdraw your child from that school.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant.
Local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.

Any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records. Note: If your child has never attended a public or private school, this section does not apply.

Complying with Your State’s Home school Law
1. File an annual certificate of enrollment.
Every year, on or before September 15, you must submit a certificate of enrollment including your and your child’s names, address, and telephone number; your child’s date of birth; and a “simple description” of the type of education your child is receiving. “Home instruction program” is an acceptable description. Contact the school attendance officer at the public school district where your child lives to request a certificate of enrollment form.
Submit the completed certificate of enrollment to the attendance officer after first saving a copy for your records. You may begin homeschooling midyear, but be sure to file the certificate of enrollment at that time.
The certificate of enrollment must be submitted by the child’s parent, a court-appointed guardian, or a person other than a parent or legal guardian who has present care or custody of the child.

2. There are no teacher qualifications, standardized testing requirements, or required subjects or days of instruction for home schools in Mississippi.
It is up to you to choose the subjects that you will teach in your home instruction program. Although public schools are required to be in session for 180 days every school year, this requirement does not apply to nonpublic schools, including home instruction programs.

Records
Keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law.
You should maintain these records for at least two years. You should keep your student’s high school records and proof of compliance with the home education laws during the high school years (including any type of home education notice that you file with state or local officials) on file forever. HSLDA’s high school webpage has additional information about home school record keeping.

Missouri

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Missouri.pdf

https://dese.mo.gov/governmental-affairs/home-schooling

Compulsory Attendance Ages
Between the ages of 7 and 17 years, or, at the parent’s option, until the student completes 16 “statutory credits” (explained below) toward high school graduation.
If a five- or six-year-old is enrolled in public school, he becomes subject to compulsory attendance immediately until the parents request in writing that he be dropped from the school’s rolls.

Required Days of Instruction
1,000 hours of instruction. At least 600 of these hours must be in the five core subjects below.
At least 400 of the 600 must occur at “the regular home school location.”
These requirements must be met within the school term (12 months or less) the parents establish. Not required for a student who has reached his sixteenth birthday.

Required Subjects
Reading, math, social studies, language arts, and science.
These subject areas (including academic courses related to them) are not individually required, but must collectively constitute at least 600 hours of the child’s instruction.

Home School Statute
Home schools must meet the following requirements...
1. A home school is defined as a school that:
a. “Has as its primary purpose the provision of private or religious based instruction”;
b. “Enrolls pupils between the ages of seven and sixteen years, of which no more than four are unrelated" (no limit on the number of students)

c. “Does not charge or receive tuition, fees or other remuneration.”
2. Home schools must maintain (but do not need to file with any official) the following records:
a. A plan book, diary, or other record indicating subjects taught and activities engaged in (an appropriate daily log could satisfy this requirement);
b. And “a portfolio of samples of child’s academic work” or “other written credible evidence, etc.”

c. And “a record of evaluations of the child’s academic progress”
d. Or “other written, credible evidence equivalent.
The school year is defined as beginning July 1 and ending the next June 30.

Withdrawing Your Child From School
Parents should provide a signed, written declaration of enrollment stating the intent to home school withing thirty days after establishment of the home school and on September 1, each year thereafter. Filing is strictly optional.
Filing may compromise the family’s privacy because the information is open to the public.
Filing has occasionally caused a family to be investigated.

Log the activities of your child(ren) daily to satisfy the record keeping requirements.

Teacher Qualifications
None

Standardized Tests
None

Children with Disabilities
Children with disabilities attending a home school program may receive special education services provided by the local school district, in accordance with Section 162.996 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, and the State Plan for Special Education.

Nevada

http://www.doe.nv.gov/Homeschooling/

Compulsory Attendance Ages

“between the ages of 7 and 18 years

Required Days of Instruction

None specified for home schools.

Required Subjects

English (including reading, composition, and writing), math, science, and social studies (including history, geography, economics, and government) as appropriate for the age and level of skill of the child, as determined by the parent. This “does not require a parent to ensure that each subject area is taught each year that the child is home schooled.”

“Home schooled child” “means a child ages 7 to 18 who receives instruction at home and“Parent” “means the parent, custodial parent, legal guardian or other person in this State who has control or charge of the child and the legal right to direct the education of the child.”

Withdrawal of Child from School

The parent must file with the superintendent of schools of the school district in which the child resides, providing a written notice of intent to homeschool the child.
a. The State Department of Education (DoE) will provide local districts with a standard notice of intent to homeschool form. The local district must make only this DoE form available to homeschool parents.
b. The superintendent of schools shall accept from a parent any completed notice of intent form

c. The notice must be filed before beginning to homeschool a child age 7 or older, or within 10 days after withdrawal from public school, or within 30 days of establishing state residency.

d. A new notice of intent must be filed within 30 days if the name or address of the parent or child changes, or within 10 days if a homeschooled child enrolls in a private or public school then returns to homeschooling. Otherwise there is no requirement to file annually when homeschooling in consecutive years.
e. The purpose of the notice of intent is to inform the school district in which the child resides that the child is exempt from the requirement of compulsory attendance.

Educational Instruction Plan

The parent must also prepare an educational plan of instruction to be filed with the notice of intent.
If a court of law should ever so require, a parent must be prepared to present the educational plan and proof of the identity of the child to the court.

The educational plan must cover the subject areas of:
(a) English, including reading, composition and writing

(b) Mathematics
(c) Science
(d) Social studies, including history, geography, economics and government.

The educational plan shall be appropriate for the age and level of skill of the child, as determined by the parent.
This does not require a parent to ensure that each subject area is taught each year that the child is home schooled. The school district shall provide to the parent a written acknowledgement that the parent filed the notice of intent.
This acknowledgement shall be deemed proof of compliance with Nevada’s compulsory attendance law. The school district shall retain a copy of the written acknowledgement for not less than 15 years.

The superintendent shall process a written request for any records relating to a child who has been home schooled within 5 days after receiving the request. The records may be released to the parent of the child or the child if he is at least 18 years or if required by statute.
School districts must allow home schooled children to participate in the high school proficiency examination and all college entrance examinations including the SAT, the ACT, the PSAT, and the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying test. Information about the availability of these tests shall be maintained on the school district’s website The private school term does not apply to children being home schooled.
Home schooled students are not eligible to enroll in distance education classes through the local public school or any Nevada charter school.

Teacher Qualifications

None

Standardized Testing

None

North Carolina
 “Between the ages of seven and 16 years.”

A child under age seven enrolled in public school in grades kindergarten through two is subject to the compulsory attendance law unless withdrawn from public school.

Required Days of Instruction

At least nine calendar months of the year, excluding reasonable holidays and vacations.

Required Subjects

None required, but annual standardized testing must measure achievement in the areas of English grammar, reading, spelling, and mathematics.

Home School Statute

1. A nonpublic school consisting of the children of not more than two families or households, where the parents or legal guardians or members of either household determine the scope and sequence of academic instruction, provide academic instruction, and determine additional sources of academic instruction.

2. A home school must meet the following requirements...

a. Operate for a nine calendar month school term.
b. Keep attendance records and disease immunization records.
c. Any new home school shall notify the State Director of the Division of Non Public Education of their intent to operate and include the school’s name and address, owner, and chief administrator.
d. The home school must also elect to operate either under the qualifications of a “private church school or school of religious charter or under the qualifications of a “qualified nonpublic school”.

e. If the home school operates in a private home, all safety and sanitation requirements are automatically waived.
f. Notify the Division of Non-Public Education upon termination of the school.

Teacher Qualification

Parent must have a high school diploma or a GED

Standardized Testing

Parent must administer an annual standardized test

Although the Division of Non-Public Education has attempted to perform home visits under this provision, the law gives its officials no right to enter homes or to inspect any records besides test scores. There is also no statutory requirement for parents to attend regional meetings arranged by the Division of Non-Public Education for the purpose of reviewing their records.

South Carolina

Compulsory Attendance Ages

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/South_Carolina.pdf

http://ed.sc.gov/districts-schools/state-accountability/home-schooling/

“five years of age before September first until... [a child’s]

Any parents whose child is “not six years of age on or before the first day of September of a particular school year may elect for their child” not to attend kindergarten, and then must sign a written document with the school district.

Required Days of Instruction

180 Days

Required Subjects

Reading, writing, math, science, and social studies; additionally, composition and literature in grades

Withdrawal Your Child From School

Formally withdraw your child from school.

Home School Statute

Three options to legally home school...

Option 1

Parents “may teach their children at home if the instruction is approved by the district board of trustees.” The boards “shall approve” (they have no discretion) if:
1. The parent has either: (a) at least a high school diploma or GED (the basic skills exam was struck down by the South Carolina Supreme Court—see below); (b) or earned a baccalaureate degree;

2. The instructional day is at least four and one-half hours, and the year at least 180 days;
3. The curriculum includes the required subjects listed above;
4. The parent presents a system of maintaining records as evidence of regular instruction including:

5. The student has access to library facilities;
6. The student participates in the annual statewide testing program and the Basic Skills Assessment

7. The parents release the district from liability regarding their child’s education.

Parents may appeal school district decisions to the State Board of Education within ten days. They may appeal State Board decisions to the Family Court within 30 days.

Option 2

Parents may teach their children at home by becoming members of the South Carolina Association of Independent Home Schools (SCAIHS) 
Parents or guardians may teach their children at home if the instruction is conducted under the auspices of the South Carolina Association of Independent Home Schools.
Bona fide membership and continuing compliance with the academic standards of South Carolina Association of Independent Home Schools exempts the home school from the further requirements of § 59-65-40.”

Under this option parents or guardians must meet the following requirements: (1) hold at least a high school diploma or GED; (2) the instructional year is at least 180 days; and (3) the curriculum includes the required subjects listed above.

Home schoolers who become members of SCAIHS are exempt from all other requirements listed in Option I above.

Option 3

Parents may teach their children at home by becoming members of an association for home

Parents or guardians may teach their children at home if the instruction is conducted under the auspices of an association for home schools which has no fewer than fifty members and meets the requirements of this section Under this option parents or guardians must meet

1. Hold at least a high school diploma or GED;
2. An instructional year of at least 180 days;
3. The curriculum includes the required subjects listed above; and 4. Educational records maintained by the parent include:

a. A plan book or other record of subjects taught and activities;
b. A portfolio of samples of the student's academic work; and
c. A semiannual progress report including attendance records and individualized documentation

Teacher Qualifications

Parents must have a high school diploma or GED.

Standardized Tests

Students complying with Option 1 must participate in the annual statewide testing program and the Basic Skills Assessment Program. If they do not perform well, the district will determine if they need to be placed in public school.

Ohio

http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Quality-School-Choice/Home-Schooling

http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/3301-34-04

Requirements to Home School

Parents or guardians who decide to home school their students are completely responsible for choosing the curriculum and course of study.
They select the curriculum and educational materials and take responsibility for educating their children.
There is no state financial assistance for families who choose this option.
Parents should start by notifying the superintendent of the school district where they reside about their intent to home school their child/or children. Parents agree to:

1. Provide 900 hours of instruction per year;
2. Notify the superintendent every year; and
3. Provide an assessment of the students work, this link below will provide the O.R.C. requirement.

http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/3301-34-04

a. have an Ohio licensed teacher administer one of the nationally normed tests, such as TerraNova, Stanford, Iowa
b. keep a portfolio of students work, have an Ohio licensed teacher provide a written assessment of the students work

c. the student can take the Ohio achievement tests with the public school district classroom

Oklahoma

https://www.ochec.com/Categories.aspx?Id=Oklahoma_Law

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/oklahoma.pdf

Oklahoma is the only state with a constitutional provision guaranteeing the right to home school.

Compulsory School Age of Attendance
"over the age of five (5) years and under the age of eighteen (18) years."

Required Days of Instruction

180 days
"A school day for any group of pupils shall consist of not less than six (6) hours devoted to school activities, except that a school day for nursery, early childhood education, kindergarten, first grade, extended day program, and alternative education programs shall be as otherwise defined by law or as defined by the State Board of Education.

Required Subjects
Reading, writing, math, science, citizenship, United States constitution, health, safety, physical education, conservation.

Teacher Qualifications and Standardized Tests
Oklahoma law does not require parents to use certified teachers or state-approved curricula, initiate contact with, register with or seek approval from state or local officials, test their students or permit public school officials to visit or inspect homes.
Home schools are not regulated, since the framers of the Oklahoma Constitution specifically intended "other means of education" to include homeschooling and gave the state no authority to regulate.

Withdrawing Your Child from School
Please follow your local school board procedures for withdrawing your child from school.

Pennsylvania

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/PA.aspx

Compulsory School Attendance Age
Children must attend school or comply with the home school laws between the ages of 8 and 17 years.
Philadelphia’s compulsory school age is 6. This early age requirement does not apply if you plan to conduct a home education program for your child and file a notice of this with the superintendent of your local school district.

Withdrawing Your Child from His or Her Current School

Formally withdraw your child from that school.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant. Your local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.
It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.

In Pennsylvania, you have several legal options under which you may choose to operate your home school program. Follow the steps listed below the option you wish to use...

Homeschooling under the home school statute:

1. Ensure that you have the required qualifications to teach.
You must have at least a high school diploma or its equivalent to teach in a home school.

2. File a notarized affidavit.
A notarized affidavit must be filed with the local superintendent before you start your home school program and by August 1 of each year after that. Affidavit forms are available on HSLDA’s website. The affidavit must include the following information:

a. The name of the parent/supervisor, name and age of child, address, and telephone number. b. Assurance that subjects are taught in English;
c. Outline of proposed education objectives by subject area;
d. Evidence of immunization;

e. Evidence of health and medical services required by law;
f. Certification that the home education program will comply with 24 P.S. § 13-1327.1; and
g. A certification that the supervisor, all adults living within the home, and persons having legal custody of the children have not been convicted of certain criminal offenses within the past five years.

Here is what to do if you have a student who has been identified under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as needing special education services (not including those identified as gifted and/or talented):
You must have your home education program approved by a state-certified special education teacher or a licensed clinical or certified school psychologist. The written approval must be submitted with your notarized affidavit.

Note: The Pennsylvania Department of Education has taken the position that if you terminate your child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP), the requirement for approval of your child’s home education program no longer applies, and the school district will not provide services.

3. Provide the required days/hours of instruction and teach the required subjects.
You must teach 180 days or 900 hours at the elementary school level and 180 days or 990 hours at the secondary level. The following courses must be taught:

Elementary-Level (K–6th grade) Required Courses

English, which must include the three subjects below: Spelling, Reading, & Writing
Arithmetic, Civics, History of the U.S. and Pennsylvania, Health and Physiology, P.E., Music, Art, Geography, Science, Safety Education

Secondary-Level (7th–12th grade) Required Courses
English, which must include the four subjects below: Language, Literature, Speech, and Composition
Mathematics: General Math, Algebra, and Geometry
Social Studies: Civics, History of U.S. and Pennsylvania, & World History
Health, P.E., Music, Art, Geography, Science, Safety Education

High School Graduation Requirements

4 credits of English; 3 credits of Math; 3 credits of Science; 3 credits of Social Studies; 2 credits of art and humanities

4. Maintain a portfolio.

Included in the portfolio must be the following documentation:

a. Log: The log must be “made contemporaneously with the instruction [and designate] by title the reading materials used . . .” HSLDA has more information about the portfolio log requirements.
b. Student work samples: These samples can be any writings, worksheets, workbooks, or creative materials used or developed by the student.
c. Standardized testing: In grades 3, 5, and 8, you must have your child tested with a nationally normed standardized test approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education or the Statewide tests administered to public school students.

The test results in math and reading/language arts or the results of the Statewide tests must be included in the annual portfolio. A parent or guardian may not be the test administrator.

Approved tests:

California Achievement Test, Comprehensive Testing Program (CTPIV), Iowa Test of Basic Skills, Metropolitan Achievement Test, Peabody Achievement Individual Test—Revised Version, Stanford Achievement Test, Terra Nova, Woodcock-Johnson Revised Tests of Achievement III, Woodcock-Johnson IV, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test III (WIAT-II 5. Have your child evaluated by a qualified evaluator and submit the evaluator’s certification to the superintendent by June 30.

Your child’s portfolio must be submitted for an annual written evaluation by (1) a licensed psychologist, (2) or a teacher certified by the state (with two years of teaching experience), (3) or a nonpublic school teacher or administrator (who must have at least two years’ teaching experience in the last 10 years in public or nonpublic schools). At the request of the homeschooling parent/supervisor, a person with other qualifications may conduct the evaluation with the prior consent of the local superintendent.

The evaluation must be based on an interview of your child and a review of the portfolio, and it “shall certify whether or not an appropriate education is occurring.”

State law defines an “appropriate education” as “instruction in the required subjects for the time required in this act and in which the student demonstrates sustained progress in the overall program.”

One place you can find an evaluator is on the website of the Christian Home school Association of Pennsylvania (CHAP).
By June 30 each year, you must submit to the local superintendent a copy of the evaluator’s certification that your child is receiving an appropriate education.
Additionally, if the superintendent has a reasonable belief at any time during the school year that an appropriate education may not be occurring, he or she may send you a letter requiring that an evaluation be conducted and that an evaluator’s certification be submitted within 30 days.

Homeschooling with a private tutor:

1. Utilize a private tutor with the required qualifications.
In order to home school your children, the tutor must be certified by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to teach in the public schools of Pennsylvania, teach one or more children who are members of a single family, provide the majority of the instruction, and receive a fee or other consideration for teaching.

2. The tutor must file a copy of his or her certification.
The tutor must file a copy of his or her Pennsylvania certification and the required criminal history record with the superintendent of the school district where your students live. HSLDA recommends that the tutor include the names and addresses of the children being tutored and notify the superintendent of any additional children he or she subsequently begins to tutor.

Tennessee

https://www.hslda.org/laws/analysis/Tennessee.pdf

Compulsory Attendance Ages
“between six (6) years of age and seventeen (17) years of age,"
Required Days of Instruction

180 days.

Required Subjects

None

Home school parents have options:

Option I: Home School Statute—Notify the Public School. “A home school is a school conducted or directed by a parent or legal guardian for their own children." Three of the five options fall under the  home school statute.

1. Parents must submit a notice of intent to the local superintendent prior to each school year “for the purpose of reporting only.”
The notice of intent must include the names, number, ages and grade levels of children involved, location of the school, curriculum to be offered (no particular subjects required), the proposed hours of instruction, and the qualifications of the parent-teacher.

2. Parents must maintain attendance records, which are subject to inspection by the local superintendent.
3. Instruction must be given 4 hours a day for the same number of days required for public schools.
4. Parents must submit proof of vaccination as required or “a signed, written statement that such immunization and other preventive measures conflict with the parent’s or guardian’s religious tenets and practices.”

Option II: Home School Statute—Associate With a Church-Related School.
“Home schools that teach kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12), where the parents are associated with and students are enrolled with a church-related school, as defined by § 49-50-801 ... are exempt” from the home school requirements above.

Standardized Tests: Option I:

Grades 5, 7 and 9 must take a standardized test administered by the Tests administered by the Commissioner of education or someone designated by him or by a professional testing service approved by the local education agency. Tests administered by the Commissioner must be without charge. If a child is failing, the parent must consult a teacher licensed by the state. The parent and teacher shall design a remedial course.

Texas

http://www.thsc.org/homeschooling-in-texas/state-requirements/

http://www.thsc.org/homeschooling-in-texas/state-requirements/texas-education-code/

To home school legally in Texas, you must follow three state law requirements...

The instruction must be bona fide
The curriculum must be in visual form (e.g., books, workbooks, video monitor).
The curriculum must include the five basic subjects of reading, spelling, grammar, mathematics, and good citizenship.

Home schooled students are exempt from compulsory attendance according to Section 25.086(a)(1) of the Texas Education Code because home schools have been determined by Texas courts to be private schools for the purpose of compulsory attendance.

Virginia
Compulsory school attendance age
Beginning in the school year during which your child is or will be 5 by September 30, you must start following Virginia’s compulsory school law.
Your child can be exempted if he or she is (or will be) 5 by September 30 but will not be 6 by September 30. Notify your school board that you do not want your child to attend school until the following year because the child is not yet mentally, physically, or emotionally ready. Send your notification in writing and keep a copy. The school board is required to exempt your child. Once your child reaches his or her 18th birthday, he or she is no longer required to obey the school laws.
Withdrawing Your Child from His or Her Current School
It is recommended that you formally withdraw your child from that school.If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant. Local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.
Homeschooling under the home instruction option:
1. Ensure that you possess one of four home instructor qualifications. You may qualify to provide home instruction in one of the following four ways:
Possess a high school diploma or higher degree, possess a current Virginia teacher’s license, provide your child with a curriculum or program of study as part of your home instruction program, or give evidence that you are able to provide your child an adequate education.
2. File annual notice with your school superintendent.
You need to file a notice with your school district superintendent that you intend to provide home instruction to your child and indicating your home instructor qualification. With the notice, you need to provide a curriculum description (which is just a list of subjects) for each child. This needs to be done every year by August 15.
If you are moving into your school district or beginning to provide home instruction after the school year has begun, you need to submit this notice “as soon as practicable.”
3. Provide an annual evaluation.
Each year by August 1, you must provide to your superintendent an evaluation showing that your child has achieved an adequate level of educational growth and progress. (This does not apply if your child was 5 or younger on September 30 at the start of the school year.) There are four types of evaluations you can submit:Results of any nationally-normed standardized achievement test showing the child attained “a composite score in or above the fourth stanine” (i.e., 23rd percentile)—this could be an ACT, SAT, or PSAT score;
An evaluation letter from a person licensed to teach in any state, or a person with a master’s degree or higher in an academic discipline, who knows about the child’s academic progress, stating that the child is achieving an adequate level of educational growth and progress; A report card or transcript from a community college or college, college distance learning program, or home-education correspondence school; or another type of “evaluation or assessment which the division superintendent determines to indicate that the child is achieving an adequate level of educational growth and progress.” (If you plan to submit this type of assessment, you should discuss this with the school system early in the school year.)

Here is what to do if your child’s year-end assessment does not show adequate progress:
It may be possible to continue homeschooling, but you will need to write a remediation plan and get the school system to accept it. If your child still does not show adequate progress after another year, you will have to stop home instruction. If you believe the superintendent has given you a wrong decision, you have 30 days to appeal. Note: It's a good idea to get your assessment done early. That way, if the results show that your child did not make adequate progress, you have time to do a different type of assessment that allows your child to show adequate progress and turn in this assessment instead.

Records

Keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law.

Washington D.C.

http://www.hslda.org/hs101/DC.aspx

Compulsory School Attendance Age

The law requires that children between age 5 (by September 30 of the current school year) and age 18 must attend school.

Withdrawing Your Child from School

It is recommended that you formally withdraw your child from that school.
If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant. Local schools may have specific forms or withdrawal procedures.
It is recommended that any correspondence with authorities be sent “Certified Mail—Return Receipt Requested.” Keep copies of the withdrawal letter and any other paperwork or correspondence, and any green postal receipts, for your personal records.

Note: If your child has never attended a public or private school, this section does not apply.

Complying with your state’s home school law

1. Make sure you have the required qualifications to home school under D.C. regulations.
D.C. regulations require that you have a high school diploma or its equivalent to home school.
If you do not have a diploma or its equivalent, you may petition the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) for a waiver by providing evidence of your ability to provide thorough, regular education. Contact HSLDA for member assistance with seeking a waiver.

2. Notify the District of Columbia that you are homeschooling.
D.C. regulations state that parents who wish to home school must use an official form provided by the OSSE.
The form is to be filed annually by August 15. The form states that it should be accompanied (initially) with a copy of your high school diploma or GED.

If you cannot locate your diploma or GED, a cover letter stating that you have one but are unable to locate it is an appropriate alternative. Not filing by August 15 does not mean you cannot home school. Contact HSLDA for specific advice about your situation if you have not filed by August 1.

3. Follow the same academic year as the public schools.
D.C. regulations state that a bona fide home education program must provide thorough, regular instruction of sufficient duration.
The regulations state that you must operate your home school program during the period of each year that public schools are in session. This requirement does not mean that homeschooling families must provide the same hours of instruction, take vacations at the same time, or teach their children for the same number of hours. Contact HSLDA for specific advice regarding your situation.

4. Teach the required subjects.
The regulations require you to teach these subjects: language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, health, and physical education.

5. Maintain a portfolio.
D.C. regulations require you to maintain a portfolio of homeschooling material that includes evidence of your child’s current work and demonstrates that the child is “engaged in thorough, regular education activities in a range of subjects.” The portfolio is to be maintained for one year and is only to be reviewed when there is reason to believe that a regular and thorough education is not being provided.

6. Be prepared to demonstrate that your child is receiving a “thorough, regular education.”
D.C. regulations state that the OSSE may request to review your portfolio of homeschooling material up to two times per year.
A review request must be made in writing, and the review must be held at a time and place mutually agreeable to the OSSE and you. Contact HSLDA immediately if this occurs. Your child is eligible to participate in public school–sponsored testing in your resident school district without charge.

Here is what may happen if the OSSE determines that your child is not receiving a “thorough, regular education”:
The regulations provide for a series of procedures for review and appeal if there is a disagreement between parents and school officials.
Ultimately, the State Superintendent of Education is empowered to issue a decision. If it is determined that a child is not receiving a “thorough, regular education,” the child must be enrolled in school within 45 days unless the decision is stayed by court order

7. Notify the District of Columbia if you discontinue homeschooling. A form must be filed 15 days prior to discontinuing homeschooling.

Records

Keep detailed records of your home school program. These records may be helpful if you face an investigation regarding your homeschooling or your student needs to furnish proof of education.
These records should include attendance records, information on the textbooks and workbooks your student used, samples of your student’s schoolwork, correspondence with school officials, portfolios and test results, and any other documents showing that your child is receiving an appropriate education in compliance with the law.

State of Washington

http://washhomeschool.org/homeschooling/the-law/

Compulsory Attendance
Compulsory attendance age in the state of Washington is 8 years old OR the age at which a child is officially enrolled in public school. If a child is under 8 and has been officially enrolled in public school, the parent must formally withdraw the child.
However, we do not file a declaration of intent for children under age 8.
The Home-Based Instruction law affects children 8 years old and older.

Parent Qualifications
To qualify to home school you must fulfill one of the following:

Have earned 45 quarter units of college level credit.
Attend a Parent Qualifying Course.
Work with a certificated teacher who meets with your student on the average of an hour a week.
Be deemed sufficiently qualified to provide home-based instruction by the superintendent of your local school district.

Required Paperwork

A Declaration of Intent to Provide Home Based Instruction must be filed annually. Also Also see our Top 10 Questions regarding the Declaration of Intent.
This form is obtained from and returned to the superintendent of the school district in which you live, or the district that accepts the student as a transfer student.
The information you need to include on the form is your child(ren’s) name and age, parent’s name, address and indicate if qualifying to homeschool by using a supervising certificated teacher, sign and date School districts are not legally authorized to vary the format of the Declaration of Intent or to request additional information.
This form protects the school – they are not responsible for the education of the child. This form protects the parent – your child(ren) are not truant.
Your declaration of intent does not limit your ability to use the public school for part-time enrollment and/or ancillary services.

Required Subjects
The 11 required subjects need to be included in your curriculum.
The 11 required subjects are reading, writing, spelling, language, math, science, social studies, history, health, occupational education, and art and music appreciation.
These do not have to be taught separately. A unit study on frogs could include reading, writing, spelling, science, math, art and occupational education.

Annual Testing
Your students must participate in annual testing.
Testing can be accomplished one of two ways:

1. Non-test Assessments – an assessment of the student’s academic progress is written by a Washington State certified teacher who is currently working in the field of education. 2. Standardized Testing – a standardized achievement test approved by the State Board of Education is administered annually to the child by a qualified individual.
Test results are part of your private home school record, no one else receives a copy.
WHO maintains a list of individuals who administer tests in your area.

Record Keeping

You must keep records.
Your home school records should include the student’s annual test scores or assessment report (see V) and immunization records, together with any other records that are kept relating to instructional and educational activities. The law is not specific on how or in what form these records are to be kept.
These are your private records and do not need to be shared with any state agency.
These records can, and probably will be, requested by school administration if your child is later enrolled in a traditional school setting.

RCW 28A.200.020 states that parents who are causing their children to receive home-based instruction shall be subject only to those minimum state laws and regulations which are necessary in ensuring that a sufficient basic educational opportunity is provided to the children receiving such instruction. Therefore, all decisions relating to philosophy or doctrine, selection of books, teaching materials and curriculum, and methods, timing and place in the provision or evaluation of home-based instruction shall be the responsibility of the parent except for matters specifically referred to in Chapter 28A.225 RCW.

Oregon

https://www.oceanetwork.org/started/law.cfm

Compulsory Age Attendance
"Children between the ages of 6 and 18 are required to attend public school unless they qualify for an exemption. If you comply with the home school procedures, your child is exempt from having to attend public school."

In order to obtain the home school exemption you must:

1. Notify the Educational Service District (ESD) of your intent to home school.

The letter must contain your name and address, names and birth dates of the children you are homeschooling and the name of the last public school your child attended or the school district in which you reside. You just send in this letter once for each child. If you move to another ESD, you need to notify the new ESD. This letter is due within 10 days of the beginning of school or 10 days of withdrawing your child from public or private school.

If you write the letter September 1st or the day you withdraw your child from public or private school, you should have no problems. Make sure you keep a copy of the letter for your files.
You may even want to send it certified mail to keep a record of its arrival. The ESD is required to acknowledge the receipt of your letter within 90 days. Keep their acknowledgment in your permanent files also. This letter is sent once. You don't need to send another letter of your intent to home educate to the ESD unless you move to a new Educational Service District.

2. Home school students are evaluated in grades 3, 5, 8 and 10.

Most students are evaluated with standardized achievement tests. Special needs students have alternate methods of evaluation.
Tests must be administered by someone who is “qualified” and not related to the child by blood or marriage.
To be “qualified” to administer tests to home educated students, the test administrator must meet one of the following qualifications: hold a current teaching license from Oregon, be licensed by the Oregon Board of Psychologist Examiners, meet publisher's qualifications for purchase of the test, or provide evidence of satisfactory completion of a graduate course in which test administration and interpretation is included in the objective. The Department of Education publishes a list of qualified test administrators on July 1st of each year. You can also check with your local ESD or home school support group for test administrators available in your area.

The ESD may request you to send a copy of the evaluation results to them for their files. (Make sure you read the Oregon Home school Laws brochure to find the list of tests, who can give the test, etc.)

3. If your home school student scores above the 15th percentile, you are free to continue home educating.

If your child falls below the 15th percentile, the law contains a three-year procedure to attempt to bring the child's scores above the 15th percentile.

United Kingdom (England)

Compulsory Attendance Ages: 5-16

There are no requirements to inform the authorities when one is home educating, unless the student was previously enrolled in the government school system.
At that time, the parent must let the school official know they are withdrawing their student to home educate him. No other requirements for home education exist.

Write to the headteacher if you plan to take your child out of school. They must accept if you’re taking your child out completely. They can refuse if you want to send your child to school some of the time.

As a parent, you must make sure your child receives a full-time education from the age of 5 but you don’t have to follow the national curriculum.
Your council can make an 'informal inquiry' to check your child is getting a suitable education at home. They can serve a school attendance order if they think your child needs to be taught at school.

Special Requirements States

Alabama
Church School: Parent has to establish a church school in the home, or the home can be an extension of an existing church school...File a church school enrollment form.
Private School: Parent may establish a private school in the home or the home an extension of a private school...Register the private school by October 10 with the Alabama Department of Education.
Private tutors must be Alabama certified teacher.

California
Parents have to establish a private school in the home.
Out of State Education Programs: Register as private school in home and ensure the school complies with California law.

Alaska
Certified teacher is required if parents use a private tutor.

Louisiana
Home study program must be approved by the Board of Education.

Massachusetts
Must be approved by the Board of Education No teacher qualification is required.

Michigan
Submit a Nonpublic School Membership Report to MDE for special education services required for special needs kids...Must have a teaching certificate or bachelor's degree.

Missouri
Register as a private institution. Kids with disabilities can receive local services provided by the state.

North Carolina
Parents must have a high school diploma or GED.

South Carolina
Option 1: Instruction must be approved by the district board of trustees...Parents have a minimum of diploma or GED.
Option 2: Become members of the S. Carolina Association of Independent Home Schools...Hold at least a diploma or GED.

Option 3: Parents may teach kids at home by becoming members of an association for home schools with at least 50 members.

Pennsylvania
The home education program must be approved, if Special Ed...the program must be approved by a certified special Ed teacher. Homeschooling with a private tutor...teacher must be certified.

Virginia
Parent must have a high school diploma or GED.

Washington State
Parent Home School Qualifications
45 quarter units of college credits.
Attend parent qualifying course.
Certified teacher meets with child once per week. Superintendent must approve local program.